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Tuesday, November 20, 2018

A Thanksgiving Potluck; Go Twice Around the Earth; Ways that Nov. 20th Matters. News edition, Nov 20 2018

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As we approach the traditional observance of THANKSGIVING throughout America, we bring word of
(1) YOUR TRIP TWICE AROUND THE EARTH, ABOARD THE INT'L SPACE STATION
(2) a THANKSGIVING POTLUCK FEAST YOU CAN ATTEND
(3) an online T'giving special, FREE from PBS
(4) why today, November 20th, is important in today's remembrances as we go forward.

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# 1 news item...

The INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION marks its 20th birthday today

It remains the most enduring example of US-Russia cooperation, even if we struggle to emulate that example right here on this Earth.

But it brings THE COOLEST THING WE HAVE TO OFFER YOU.

Take a trip around our blue planet with THE LONGEST CONTINUAL TIMELAPSE ever from the ISS, to celebrate its 20th birthday. It was just released, late Monday.

Sit back, float, and be dazzled on your cyber screen:

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2018/11/Space_Station_20th_longest_continual_timelapse_from_space

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# 2 news item...

JOIN THE ANNUAL THANKSGIVING POTLUCK FEAST AT THE LEARNING GARDEN

With Thanksgiving nearly here, the invitation has once again been issued to join the welcoming good folks -- this time for the 10th annual celebration -- of this traditional holiday on Nov. 27th at the Learning Garden, alongside the campus of Venice High School, at Walgrove Av & Venice Bl, Los Angeles, CA 90066.

Bring your potluck dish to share and gather at 11 am to eat at noon. 

Gardenmaster David King says, "We celebrate our harvest with the staff and clients of the 'Program For Torture Victims,' introduce them to our holiday and acknowledge all we are truly grateful for. We try to end off early to allow many to go to their homes and celebrate with friends and family. Please be a part of our neighborly efforts - bring a dish appropriate to the season and your own plates and eating utensils to make this as waste-free as can be. We thank you and are grateful all days for our community."

More at:
 https://communitygarden.org/find-a-garden/gardens/the-learning-garden/

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# 3 news item...

"THE PILGRIMS," FREE, FROM "AMERICAN EXPERIENCE"

Now streaming online, on demand, FREE for a limited time

The journey of the Pilgrims to the "New World" is a seminal, if often misunderstood episode of American history. The docudrama, "The Pilgrims," tells the true story of a small group of religious radicals whose determination to establish a separatist religious community planted the seeds for America's founding. From deceiving and exploiting the Native Americans to dealing with their own internal politics and manipulations by oligarchs in England, this docudrama attempts to tell the full story.

It's a good opportunity to bring some context to your holiday gathering, including debunking the myths about what they ate. And it might be just the ticket to avoid hearing your bloviating uncle espouse his toxic politics.

"American Experience" is produced for PBS by WGBH Boston.

"The Pilgrims" is available to stream online, or via the PBS app, for just a few more days before it returns to their archive. Watch it FREE, at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/pilgrims/#part01

More info and clips at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/pilgrims/

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# 4 news item...

NOVEMBER 20th's ANNIVERSARIES, AND THEIR LEGACIES

☆ Today is the annual "Trans Day of Remembrance"...

It brings the somber reminder that anti-trans violence is still killing people worldwide simply because they are "different," and it's on the rise in the United States of America where minorities of all kinds are encountering a reinvigorated intolerance. Thus, it's a day to draw attention that the current administration has announced it is issuing a memo to remove all existing legal protections from trans persons in the US.
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☆ It was twenty years ago today...

It's the INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION's 20th birthday. See feature # 1 for two times around the world, in a dazzling video from orbit!
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☆ With resonance 50 years ago & now, today was RFK's not-so-long-ago birthday.

On Nov. 20th in 1925, the late Senator ROBERT F. KENNEDY was born. He would have turned 93 if he were alive today.

Earlier this year, history marked the 50th anniversary of "Bobby's" assassination in Los Angeles at the rather young age of 43, just after his victory in the California Primary for the Democratic nomination for president.

In that turbulent year of 1968, Dr. MARTIN LUTHER KING Jr. was assassinated in April, and Bobby's speech on that awful night was credited with preventing violence. But just weeks later, in June, another bullet took the life of RFK.

With him gone that summer, Vice President HUBERT HUMPHREY won the Democratic nomination for president without ever entering a single primary. As Humphrey was awarded the nomination at the Party's convention in Chicago, massive protests against the Vietnam War filled the Windy City's streets, bringing violence that an official report later deemed "a police riot."

GOP nominee RICHARD NIXON went on to win the presidency by a slim margin in the 1968 national election -- after he had secretly sabotaged the peace deal brokered in Paris by outgoing President LYNDON JOHNSON that would have ended the war by the end of 1968.

Thus the war that was raging 50 years ago would go on pointlessly for another six years. Ttens of thousands more would die. And Nixon's presidency would end in an altogether different scandal -- in another case of his secret sabotage, called Watergate.
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☆  THE FOREGOING serves to remind us that our past -- of 50 years ago, AND in more recent times -- can either instruct or haunt us... It always matters that we pay attention and act, or history will judge us as harshly for what we didn't do, as for what we do that's harmful.

Fast forward. There's plenty to think about as we mark the 50th anniversary of the year that the Vietnam War could have ended, but didn't; the 17th anniversary of America's unending war in Afghanistan; the 15th anniversary of our endless war in Iraq; all, as we continue to enable Saudi Arabia's ongoing war against the civilian population of Yemen; and as we conduct clandestine drone, cruise missile, and air-strike wars in Syria and all over Africa.

And on Thursday, US troops will pause, worldwide, for another Thanksgiving feast while deployed in some foreign land where the locals are trying to kill them. They will hope for a few hours, or even a few moments, of safety and calm, dreaming of home, wherever they are.

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☆ THANKSGIVING FINDS CALIFORNIANS NOT EXACTLY FEELING THANKFUL

After the Thousand Oaks nightclub massacre and massive wildfires that started within hours; over 700 people still missing in the "Camp" fire's charred landscape; thousands made homeless; and millions breathing smoke, though they are hundreds of miles away from the fires; the events of this month in California merge into one thing that feels apocalyptic -- and even short attention spans can't dismiss any of it as "sooo -last-week."

Thus we looked for, found, and recommend a perspective by John Davis in today's edition of "Counter Punch." It begins, appropriately, with the Southern California equivalent of the Pilgrims interaction with the Native American Indians on the opposite coast. A seacoast that, like ours, here, a seaborne "caravan" of uninvited immigrants invaded. Starting there, it brings us hard-up against what we've done to California -- and, as practioners of Manifest Destiny, to most everything else -- ever since.

It has a lot packed into a few words. For example, did you know that the giant Southern California wildfire "started somewhere on the 2,668 acre Santa Susana Field Laboratory. Up until 2006 this facility had been used to test nuclear reactors and rocket engines for over fifty years." 

It's a solid short read, at:

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/11/20/geographies-of-violence-in-southern-california/

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☆  THINGS TO BE GRATEFUL FOR...

If that seems elusive or dubious, stick around just another minute. Here's our not-just-for-us, but-for-everyone list:

• We're still here. Us to write this, and you to read it.

• We've still got the music, even if we no longer have all the music-makers who have enriched our lives.

• We still have each other. Friends, family, dogs, cats, hamsters, pet goldfish, that favorite shirt, a jacket to keep us warm this winter, and something -- even if not gourmet fare -- to eat this Thanksgiving.

• And if you're reading this, "Well, I don't have those things," then we invite you to attend the Thanksgiving Potluck and chat with some of the humble guests who will be there as members of the International Victims of Torture organization. You'll make new friends and they just might change your outlook and perspective. About a lot of things.

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That's all for this edition. Stay tuneful!

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We'll be back again soon with music news and more "News of the Non-Trumpcentric Universe." (c)

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LEGALESE, CONTACTING US, 'N SUCH...

Boilerplate? Where's the main pressure gauge? And the firebox?

What "boilerplate"? Who came up with that goofy term for the basic essential informational stuff...
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♪ The ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE endeavors to bring you NEWS – and views of interest to artists everywhere – more specifically to musicians and the creative community and music makers and fans of acoustic and Folk-Americana music. That includes both traditional and innovative forms. From the deepest roots to today’s acoustic renaissance, that’s our beat. We provide a wealth of resources, including a HUGE catalog of acoustic-friendly venues (now undergoing a major update), and inside info on FESTIVALS and select performances in Southern California in venues from the monumentally large to the intimately small and cozy. We cover workshops, conferences, and other events for artists and folks in the music industry, and all kinds o’ things in the world of acoustic and Americana and accessible classical music. From washtub bass to musical spoons to oboe to viola to banjo to squeezebox, from Djangostyle to new-fangled-old-time string band music, from sweet Cajun fiddle to bluegrass and pre-bluegrass Appalachian mountain music to all the swamp water roots of the blues and the bright lights of where the music is headed now.
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The Acoustic Americana Music Guide. Thanks for sittin' a spell. The cyber porch'll be here anytime you come back from the road.

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Sunday, November 18, 2018

Get $ OUT of politics: debate is Monday on the web. Special edition, Sun, Nov 18 2018.

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LATE ADDITION: Monday marks the day in 1863 that President ABRAHAM LINCOLN delivered the Gettysburg Address.

As media critic Lionel of "Lionel Media" observes, Lincoln, "in 272 words cemented history with a breviloquence today's monosyllabic pol couldn't recognize much less duplicate. Imagine today's version: A misspelled tweet starting with the now ubiquitous and mandatory 'Hey, guys.'"

We agree, Lionel. Moreover, it's a good slap up 'side the head to tell us that we, too, live in historic times.

"Historic" not because they are saturated with social-media-vectored, death-of-privacy, quasi-legalized for-profit-universal-cyberspying -- and the resulting dumbing-down of everything because the algorithm analytics tells "them" it can be used to sell "us" all manner of junk we don't need, including politicians.

But "historic" because we're letting it all happen, after so many of our forebears fought and died to protect the individual freedoms we wantonly surrender in return for some immersive, self-indulgent, addictive, and ultimately silly free "app" that monitors, tracks, and reports every move we make.

Hence, the purpose of this, yesterday's special edition, because it brings important notice of something happening TODAY, Monday. Call it notice of an "alternative reality" we can still reclaim. That is, if non-mainstream news sources like ours can collectively generate enough awareness of the effort. And what is that effort? It's the attempt, as time grows critically short, to make America AMERICA again, and take back our rights and freedoms from rich manipulators who feel entitled to control everything.

So if you didn't see it Sunday, please read it now. IT'S ACTUALLY FEWER WORDS THAN THIS "LATE ADDITION" that we added in front of it.

The full edition as originally published is just below.

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All the weekend EVENTS are in the previous edition, and our tribute to ROY CLARK, who died Thursday, is in its own edition ahead of that; the tribute includes a Sunday night LATE ADDITION with details of Roy's memorial service, which will STREAM LIVE ON THE WEB Wednesday afternoon. Scroll down or use the sidebar at left to select those other editiins.

THIS IS a short, special edition, and here it is:


Watch the live stream, or later on-demand...



Mon, Nov 19, LIVE ON THE WEB:

3:30 pm-4:30 pm (Pacific time) - "28th Amendment Debate" to GET MONEY OUT OF POLITICS.

* Link below will connect you LIVE, and also work later for an on-demand replay.

* Livestream broadcast of the sold-out debate.

* A Constitutional Amendment has been proposed to reinstate political spending limits.

* Since the disastrous US Supreme Court decisions in "Citizens United" and "McCutcheon," which declared that money is "free speech," the rich rule the roost. Their ability to buy candidates, elected officials, and political party agendas is, at present, unlimited.

* A Constitutional Amendment is required to reverse that, and ensure an equal voice for all Americans.

* Debating in favor of this amendment are Jeff Clements, President and Founder of the cross-partisan nonprofit "American Promise," and Elizabeth Doty, business leader and co-founder of the "American Promise Bay Area Business Council."

* Debating in opposition are Bradley Smith, former chairman of the FEC and Founder of the "Institute of Free Speech," and Floyd Abrams, Senior Counsel at the political law firm of Cahill Gordon & Reindel.

* Moderating the debate is Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, Fellow at the "Brennan Center for Justice," and Leroy Highbaugh Sr. Research Chair and Professor of Law at Stetson University.

* This debate is hosted by "American Promise," the "American Constitution Society," and the "National Constitution Center" in Philadelphia.

* PREPARE / LEARN WHAT'S AT STAKE: read Jeff Clements' pre-debate op-ed for a 28th Amendment, in the Philadelphia Inquirer, at:

http://www2.philly.com/philly/opinion/commentary/campaign-finance-spending-elections-first-amendment-20181116.html

* The Guide believes we need the 28th Amendment if we want to level the playing field for all Americans regardless of wealth. Like other amendments in American history that have protected individual rights, the 28th Amendment will establish better representation for all Americans. In so doing, it will produce a huge step toward the better governance we so urgently need to save democracy from oligarchy, corporatocracy, kakistocracy, and kleptocracy.

* WATCH THE DEBATE LIVE AT:

 https://constitutioncenter.org/debate/live

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The Guide waives our copyright on this special edition to encoencourage you to share it far and wide.
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We'll be back soon with lots of MUSIC NEWS.

Meantime, remember, the weekend's events and everything else from our publication's lengthy past are available in the archive, accessible from the sidebar at left. (You may need to find and click the button for "full web version or "desktop version," depending on your device and browser, to see the sidebar.)
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Saturday, November 17, 2018

Saturday & Sunday Arts & Music Scene. Nov 17 2018 edition.

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Here's your Southern California music and arts scene for this weekend -- plus one HEADS-UP TICKET ALERT for a December event.

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Our Thursday feature, celebrating the life of ROY CLARK, who died that day, is still available, at:

https://acousticamericana.blogspot.com/2018/11/roy-clark-is-gone-at-age-85-thursday.html


We've published lots of news recently, and you can select previous editions in the sidebar at left -- you may need to hit "view desktop edition," or something that reads similarly, depending on your device and browser. But it's all there, going back to when Lassie was a lil' bitty puppy dog and Napoleon was a private.
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For today and tomorrow, the emphasis is on staying indoors. Partly that's because the season causes bookings to go that way.

But it's also for you to avoid breathing smoke and lingering particulates.

The air is far worse in San Francisco -- the City by the Bay had the worst air quality IN THE WORLD on Friday, as winds combined to blow current and past palls of smoke and pile them up there, from a week's worth of the horrific destruction of the Northern Cal "Camp" fire. Saying that the state has had it rough is a paltry understatement. Firefighters and first responders have come to help from near and far. Many have been on the fire lines north and south for days with little to eat and practically no real rest. We could insert a smarmy note here, that more overstretched resources will go away from public safety to enable a presidential visit today -- but, hey, if he actually learns something, that could be of great benefit.
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This coming Tuesday is the annual "giving" day when you'll be bombarded with appeals from all manner of charities.

We'll be providing a list, with links, for charities and relief organizations involved directly in the California wildfires, helping victims and helping those who help us in public safety.

We're suggesting that the most appropriate HOLIDAY GIFTS, in this year of record fires, are donations to appropriate relief funds, made in the names of your friends and loved ones.

And we hope we can ALL think about that as the psychological warfare of mindless consumerism arrives with its lizard-brain appeals to hedonism and its efforts to implant notions that it's hopeless for you to be considered cool if you don't buy the right trendy crap. We're looking at YOU, advertising moguls of "Black Friday" and "Cyber Monday" and you programmers of bots who send-out all those coupons and "We're-not-done-yet, just-pay-a-separate-fee" stupid "offers" for junk we've all lived our whole lives, so far, without needing.

If that sounds like too much, hey, like we said, it's been a tough week for all of us in California.

So, hey, go listen to some wonderful musicians making live music this weekend. And maybe chew a spell on the rest of it.

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Events are presented chronologically, by day and start time.


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Saturday...

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Sat, Nov 17, ON THE RADIO:

6-8 am - "ART POWELL'S FOLK-POURI" makes its occasional airing live on KPFK 90.7 FM in Southern Cal.

* For all others, nationwide / globally, it's streaming live at: http://kpfk.org

*  After that, it archives for 14 days for on-demand listening, at: http://archive.kpfk.org

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Sat & Sun, Nov 17 & 18:

11 am- all day, into the night, & Sunday - "PATSY'S PUB 35th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION," with Bagpipes, Live Music, and '80s Costume Contest, at Patsy's Irish Pub, 28971 Golden Lantern St #108, Laguna Niguel, California 92677

* Main stage Sat, noon-3 pm, is trad "IRISH DUET WITH EAMON CARROLL"

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Sat, Nov 17:

1-4 pm - ORQUESTRA CHARANGOA plays a FREE show at Fisherman's Village, 13755 Fiji Way, Marina del Rey, CA 90292.

* FREE show, free 2-hr parking.

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Sat, Nov 17, FILM SCREENING:

1:30 pm - "YOUNG GUNS" (1988) is part of the series, "WHAT IS A WESTERN?" at the Autry Museum of the American West, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

* This 1988 surprise hit was described by historian Paul Hutton as the most historically accurate movie about Billy the Kid and the Lincoln County War.

* Directed by Christopher Cain. Stars Emilio Estevez, Keifer Sutherland, and Lou Diamond Phillips.

* Screened in 35mm / Rated R

* Included With Museum Admission; Space Is Limited / Reservations Recommended at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-is-a-western-film-series-young-guns-1988-tickets-50079177167

* Check-out www.TheAutry.org/30Years to see upcoming films and related events.

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Sat, Nov 17:

2 pm - "A BRONX TALE: THE MUSICAL" is a touring show, at the Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Bl, Hollywood, CA, 90028

* "A musical based on the play by the same name with a book by Chazz Palminteri, music by Alan Menken, and lyrics by Glenn Slater. After a ten year development process, the original one-man show was adapted into this new musical." -- Playbill.

* Tix, $39-$155, by phone, 323-468-1770; online, https://thrillcall.com/concerts/2780939-a-bronx-tale-the-musical-a-bronx-tale-the-musical-touring-pantages-theatre-los-angeles-2018

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*** SPECIAL NOTICE: $10 TIX***

Sat, Nov 17:

5 pm - L.A. PHILHARMONIC performs "FLUXUS: FLUXCONCERT - LA MONTE YOUNG," billed as "the wildest concert of the season," at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S Grand Av, Los Angeles, CA 90012;

* A rare performance of a two-hour section of La Monte Young’s "The Second Dream of The High-Tension Line Stepdown Transformer" from "The Four Dreams of China," directed by the composer, with lighting by Marian Zazeela.

* Program: LA MONTE YOUNG and MARIAN ZAZEELA : The Melodic Version (1984) of The Second Dream of The High-Tension Line Stepdown Transformer from The Four Dreams of China (1962) in Dream Light,  La Monte Young, composer.

* Artists: Los Angeles Philharmonic; La Monte Young, composer; Marian Zazeela, light artist; Jung Hee Choi, director.

* Tix are CHEAP, just $10. Seating is general admission by section.

* Get tix at: https://www.laphil.com/events/performances/533/2018-11-17/fluxus-fluxconcert-la-monte-young/

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Sat, Nov 17:

7 pm - WITHERWARD at the Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N Lake Av, Altadena, CA; phone for reservations, 10 am-10 pm, 7 days, at: 626-798-6236.

* WITHERWARD is a permanently touring trio. Now back in the states from their Subaru Europe sponsored tour, they bring beautiful acoustic and electric guitars, explosive violin and mandolin, and thick three part harmony. The trio will make you laugh and cry through their exploration of the many sub-genres of folk and Americana. Come hear the stories behind the songs and experience what it’s like to live on the open road.

* Tix, $18.

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Sat, Nov 17:

7:30 pm - MEN OF WORTH plus BERNICE LEWIS  play the monthly "Living Tradition" concert series at the Anaheim Downtown Community Center, 250 E Center St, Anaheim, CA 92805.

* Info: www.thelivingtradition.org

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Sat, Nov 17:

7:30 pm - SWINGRIOTS QUIRKTETTE play the Pocock Brewing Company, 24907 Avenue Tibbitts, Ste B, Santa Clarita, CA 91355; 661-775-4899.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - LAURENCE JUBER, Grammy-winning guitar wizard from Paul McCartney's WINGS, plays the Grand Annex, 434 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731; 310-833-6362.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - THE KINGSTON TRIO plays Lancaster Performing Arts Center, 750 W Lancaster Bl, Lancaster, CA 93534; 661-723-5950.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - WEST MY FRIEND plays the "Camarillo Cafe" concert series at Camarillo Community Center, 1605 E Burnley St., Camarillo, CA 93010; 805-814-9366.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - RODNEY CROWELL plays the Janet and Ray Scherr Forum Theatre at Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Center, 2100 Thousand Oaks Bl, Thousand Oaks, CA 91362; 805-449-2787.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - BEN HUNTER & JOE SEAMONS play Boulevard Music, 4316 Sepulveda Bl, Culver City, CA 90230; 310-398-2583.

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Sat, Nov 17:

SOLD OUT: 8 pm - PETER ASHER & ALBERT LEE play Campus Jax, 3950 Campus Dr, Newport Beach, CA 92660

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - RICHIE FURAY plays The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano Rd, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675; 949- 496-8930.

* The American singer, songwriter, and Rock & Roll Hall of Fame member is best known for forming the bands BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD with Stephen Stills, Neil Young, Bruce Palmer, and Dewey Martin, and POCO with Jim Messina, Rusty Young, George Grantham and Randy Meisner, and for the trio, SOUTHER HILLMAN FURAY.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - PACIFIC SYMPHONY performs Respighi's "Church Windows," and "Poems Autumnal," at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Dr, Costa Mesa, CA 92626; 714-556-2787.

* Pacific Symphony is the largest orchestra formed in the U.S. in the last 40 years, the Symphony is recognized as an outstanding ensemble making strides on both the national and international scene, as well as in its own community of Orange County. Presenting more than 100 concerts a year and a rich array of education and community programs, the Symphony reaches more than 275,000 residents—from school children to senior citizens.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - "QUACK" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre

9820 Washington Bl, Culver City, CA, 90232; 213- 628-2772.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - GUITAR SHORTY plus BOBBY BLUEHOUSE BAND play the "Winter Blues Series" at Arcadia Blues Club, 16 E Huntington Dr, Arcadia, CA.

*  Doors at 7; FREE parking behind venue and in nearby city lot.

* Venue has full bar; menu with generous portions, two can share.

* Pool tables, plenty of seating, dance floor space, two stages at opposite ends to keep the music continuous.

*  Fun place, but bring earplugs. Seriously.

* Adv tix at a substantial discount, available for all shows at the venue, at: http://arcadiabluesclub.eventbrite.com

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Sat, Nov 17:

8 pm - CELTIC THUNDER in Concert, at the Orpheum Theatre, 842 S Broadway, L.A., CA 90014.

* Since their inception in 2007, Celtic Thunder "have gone from success to success with their mixture of traditional Celtic folk songs with more contemporary numbers (not to mention their boy band looks)!"

* More, incl tix info, at: www.celticthunder.com

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Sat, Nov 17:

8-10 pm - THE ALMOST FREE BENEFIT COMEDY SHOW" with DAVID ZASLOFF at (and to benefit) The Spirit of Studio 12, 6006 Laurel Canyon Bl, North Hollywood, CA 61601

* Tix, only $5

* All Proceeds Go To Studio 12

* For More Information Call:

Will W. 818-915-0534 or David Z. 818-566-1442.

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Sat, Nov 17:

8:30 pm - THE STEFANI VALADEZ ENSEMBLE plays Casa Nueva, 23759 Roscoe Bl, West Hills, CA 91307; 818-340-7900.

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Sat, Nov 17:

10 pm - THE LADS bring their Irish Music to O'Malley's on Main, 140 Main St, Seal Beach, California 90740; www.omalleyssealbeach.com

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Sunday...

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Sun, Nov 18:

9:30 am- 2:30 pm - Weekly "BLUEGRASS BRUNCH" with a variety of bands, every Sunday at Urban Solace, 3823 30th St, San Diego, CA 92104.

* Find out who's performing, or make table reservations, at: 619-295-6464.

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Sun, Nov 18:

10 am - CLINTON DAVIS plays Bird Rock Coffee Roasters, 5627 La Jolla Bl, San Diego, CA 92037

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Sun, Nov 18:

10:30 am-noon - "HOUSE OF IRELAND TRADITIONAL IRISH SESSION" happens every Sunday, sometimes with additional nearby traditional music, plus food, culture-sharing, and featured participation by the entire surrounding village of "International Houses," at the House of Ireland in Balboa Park, 665 Pan American Plaza, San Diego, CA.

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Sun, Nov 18:
Noon-3 pm - "WESTERN MUSIC SHOWCASE" SPONSORED BY THE Western Music Association's California Chapter, at the Autry Museum of the American West, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

* Many of those performing are freshly returned from the WMA's national convention, and some will be sporting freshly-earned awards.

* Admission is free for WMA members and performers.

* The showcase is included with regular museum admission for all listeners.

* Go early -- the museum has PLENTY to see, and a special "Latin American Crafts Marketplace" runs all weekend.

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Sun, Nov 18:

Noon-2 pm - MURPHY'S FLAW plays the monthly bluegrass brunch at Viva Rancho Cantina, 900 W Riverside Dr, Burbank, CA (next to the L.A. Equestrian Center).

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Sun, Nov 18:

2 pm - PAULA BOGGS BAND plays the Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N Lake Av, Altadena, CA; phone for reservations, 10 am-10 pm, 7 days, at: 626-798-6236.

* This 6-piece ensemble traverses jazz, world, rock, and Americana.

* Their sound is “Seattle-Brewed Soulgrass” and the band has performed 100+ shows nationally and in Canada since releasing “Carnival of Miracles.”

* The band released an “unplugged” EP of consciousness songs, “Live at Empty Sea, Songs of Protest & Hope” and a 3rd studio album, "Elixir, The Soulgrass Sessions," also produced by Shoemaker, in 2017.

* Interesting side notes on Paula Boggs: She had a 14-year career in public service, including as a federal prosecutor, and attorney for the U.S. military and for the White House. She is an Army Airborne veteran, and received a Congressional appointment to the US Naval Academy – among America’s first women to do so. She also spent many years as Starbucks' top lawyer and as a vice president at Dell Corporation.

* Tix, $18.

___



Sun, Nov 18:

2 pm - "CAMERON CARPENTER PLAYS SAINT-SAËNS" with the L.A. PHILHARMONIC at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S Grand Av, Los Angeles, CA 90012;

* The colorful, iconoclastic Cameron Carpenter shows off Walt Disney Concert Hall’s awe-inspiring pipe organ with the crushing power chords of Poulenc’s idiosyncratic Concerto and Saint-Saëns’ beloved, melody-rich Third Symphony.

* Program: CHRISTOPHER CERRONE: "The Insects Became Magnetic" (World premiere, LA Phil commission with generous support from Elizabeth and Justus Schlichting); POULENC: "Organ Concerto"; Intermission; SAINT-SAËNS: Symphony No. 3, “Organ.”

* Artists: Los Angeles Philharmonic, Roderick Cox, conductor; Cameron Carpenter, organ.

* GO EARLY: Pre-Concert Talk, "Upbeat Live" with Christopher Russell – 1 pm. Enhance your concert experience with this pre-concert talk. The "Upbeat Live" series provides historical and cultural context for many concerts, featuring engaging speakers, audio examples, and special guests. These events are free to ticket holders and held in BP Hall, on the second floor, accessible after your ticket is scanned.

* Tix at: "https://www.laphil.com/events/performances/243/2018-11-18/cameron-carpenter-plays-saint-saens/

___



Sun, Nov 18:

3 pm - THE KINGSTON TRIO plays the Poway Center for the Performing Arts, 15498 Espola Rd, Poway, CA 92064; 858-668-4797.

___



Sun, Nov 18:

3 pm - WEST MY FRIEND, the Canadian eclectic acoustic ensemble, plays Fiddler's Crossing, 206 East F St, Tehachapi, CA 93561; 661-823-9994.

___



Sun, Nov 18:

5 pm - TROOPER THORNE plays the Harp Inn Irish Pub, 130 E. 17th St, Costa Mesa, CA; www.harpinn.com

___



Sun, Nov 18:

7 pm - EARTH MAMA SONG SWAP plays the Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N Lake Av, Altadena, CA; phone for reservations, 10 am-10 pm, 7 days, at: 626-798-6236.

* An all-girl trio. Read about each, below.

* JILL FREEMAN has been a professional singer/songwriter for over 20 years. Her solo album, "Songs about Sex and Depression", released on Magic Records, received rave reviews and resulted in placement of her songs in several motion pictures. One of these is a featured recording by EMI artists "Once Blue" of her song "Kisses Good" in Touchstone Pictures, "Mister Wrong”. Jill's songs and singing voice have continued to be used in television and films on such shows as: Raising Hope, Chelsea Lately, Better Off Ted, The Oranges, among many others. She most recently placed a song in the 2018 major motion picture, “Book Club”. In her 2016 CD, “A Handmade Life” Jill uses traditional folktales as a springboard into the dark pool of her own psyche, inviting listeners to embark on their own inner journey. Jill continues to write and perform live with her husband, songwriter/producer JOEL WACHBRIT.

* BERNICE LEWIS: With four decades as a national touring artist and seven acclaimed CD’s, Singer/Songwriter Bernice Lewis has built a solid national fan base. She is also a published poet, a producer, and an educator extraordinaire. She is an Artist in Residence for the National Park Service and the Artist Associate of Songwriting at Williams College in Williamstown, MA. Her ballad, "Bridges That Hold," was included in Peter, Paul and Mary's Lifelines video (PBS). and has shared the stage with many renowned artists, including Dar Williams, Dixie Chicks, Patty Griffin, Pete Seeger, Ellis Paul, Rory Block, Livingston Taylor, Odetta, Christine Lavin, Marty Sexton, Patty Larkin, Mary Gauthier, Catie Curtis.

* LAURIE MCCLAIN: While Americana Folk Singer/songwriter Laurie McClain accompanies herself expressively on guitar, ukulele and harmonica, it's her honey voice that soothes and her powerful lyrics that heal hearts. Reminiscent of 60s/70s folk, her songs are messages of hope for a weary world.

* Tix, $18.

___



Sun, Nov 18:

7 pm - DANIEL KAHN & THE PAINTED BIRD play the Pico Union Project, 1153 Valencia St, Los Angeles CA 90015

___



Sun, Nov 18:

SOLD OUT: 7 pm - PETER ASHER & ALBERT LEE play Bogie's Bar, 32001 Agoura Rd, Westlake Village, CA 91361; 818-889-2394.

___



Sun, Nov 18:

8 pm - CLINTON DAVIS plays the Sycamore Den, 3391 Adams Av, San Diego, CA 92116

___



Sun, Nov 18:

9 pm - JOHN MAYALL plays The Canyon - Westfield Valencia Town Center, 24201 Valencia Bl, Suite 1351, Santa Clarita, CA 91355

___



___________________

TICKET ALERT...

___________________


Dec 16:

"THE MOST CLASSIC HOLIDAY MUSIC EVER" presented by Los Cancioneros Master Chorale, celebrating its 70th season, at the James R. Armstrong Theater, 3330 Civic Center Dr, Torrance, CA; www.LCMasterChorale.com

* "WOW-WORTHY" with renowned NY Metropolitan Opera tenor / local boy who has "made it big" AARON BLAKE as special guest.

*  From Shaw to Rutter to Hairston to Esenvalkds and many more, this Holiday Concert will quickly bring you into the holiday mood. Joining us for this concert is renowned Metropolitan Opera tenor and former LCMC Scholarship recipient, Aaron Blake. Of course you will be asked to join in with our audience carol sing-along.

* Read the local South Bay newspaper's delightful story (Nov 16 edition) on AARON BLAKE at: https://easyreadernews.com/high-notes-from-the-hill/

* Tix, $25 for adults, $15 for students; plus a $1.00 service charge.

* Get your tickets NOW, while you still can, by phone or online: 310-781-7171 (theatre box office), or online:

https://squareup.com/store/lcmc/item/the-most-classic-holiday-music-ever

___



____________________





That's all for this edition. Stay tuneful!





____________________













<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>







We'll be back again soon with music news and more "News of the Non-Trumpcentric Universe." (c)







+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+







LEGALESE, CONTACTING US, 'N SUCH...







Boilerplate? Where's the main pressure gauge? And the firebox?







What "boilerplate"? Who came up with that goofy term for the basic essential informational stuff...



________________________________







Direct to the Guide's current editions /







MOBILE-DEVICE-FRIENDLY







editions load quickly at



.



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.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



.



CONTACT US -- Post Comments / Send Questions / say Howdy at:







Tiedtothetracks (at) Hotmail (dot) com



.



OR USE THE COMMENTS FUNCTION on the Blogspot site.



.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



Entire contents copyright © 2018,



Lawrence Wines & Tied to the Tracks.



All rights reserved.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



.



♪ The ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE endeavors to bring you NEWS – and views of interest to artists everywhere – more specifically to musicians and the creative community and music makers and fans of acoustic and Folk-Americana music. That includes both traditional and innovative forms. From the deepest roots to today’s acoustic renaissance, that’s our beat. We provide a wealth of resources, including a HUGE catalog of acoustic-friendly venues (now undergoing a major update), and inside info on FESTIVALS and select performances in Southern California in venues from the monumentally large to the intimately small and cozy. We cover workshops, conferences, and other events for artists and folks in the music industry, and all kinds o’ things in the world of acoustic and Americana and accessible classical music. From washtub bass to musical spoons to oboe to viola to banjo to squeezebox, from Djangostyle to new-fangled-old-time string band music, from sweet Cajun fiddle to bluegrass and pre-bluegrass Appalachian mountain music to all the swamp water roots of the blues and the bright lights of where the music is headed now.



.



The Acoustic Americana Music Guide. Thanks for sittin' a spell. The cyber porch'll be here anytime you come back from the road.







<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>




Friday, November 16, 2018

Friday Night's Live Music Scene. Nov 16 2018.

.
.
We've covered a lot of ground lately, including our tribute yesterday to ROY CLARK upon learning of his death. That's still available -- as is everything else -- by scrolling-down past this edition, or selecting it from the sidebar at left (depending on your browser and what kind of device you're using to read this.)

HERE 'N NOW, we have FRIDAY'S EVENTS for you. We'll be along again soon with the rest of the weekend's music and arts scene.
___

One quick SATURDAY MORNING note:

Sat, Nov 17, ON THE RADIO:

6-8 am - "ART PODELL'S FOLK-POURI" makes its occasional airing live on KPFK 90.7 FM in Southern Cal.

* For all others, nationwide / globally, it's streaming live at: http://kpfk.org

*  After that, it archives for 14 days for on-demand listening, at: http://archive.kpfk.org

___

Now, here are your options for a tuneful Friday sojourn..,

Fri, Nov 16:

7 pm - RICHIE FURAY plays The Troubadour, 9081 Santa Monica Bl, West Hollywood, CA 90069; 310-276-6168.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

7 pm - GRAEME JAMES plays the Soka Performing Arts Center, 1 University Dr, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656; 949-480-4278.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

7:30 pm - WEST MY FRIEND plays the San Diego Folk Heritage series at Templars Hall in Old Poway Park, 14134 Midland Rd, Poway, CA 92064; 858-566-4040.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - PHIL SALAZAR & THE KIN FOLK, plus THE SALTY SUITES, play the famous concert hall in back of McCabe's Guitar Shop, 3101 Pico Bl, Santa Monica, CA 90405; www.mccabes.com

* Longtime top Southern Cal faves, Phil Salazar and the Kin Folk (PSKFBand) is a group of friends that have been recording and performing together for 33 years. Phil Salazar, a stalwart of the Southern California bluegrass scene, is joined by his amazingly talented Kin Folk, Tom Corbett, Bill Knopf, Rick Borella, Bill Flores, & Charl Ann Gastineau. They mix traditional folk music with rock, blues, country, jazz, Irish, pop, and bluegrass... And plenty more that's great pickin', grinnin', and listenin'.

* The Salty Suites -- according to their rather fanciful bio -- played their first show together in a high security prison for the criminally insane. Ah, no. But they do enjoy spending time with their cats, drinking whiskey and taking long walks on the beach. Their music is heavily influenced by small woodland creatures and traveling encyclopedia salesmen. Lyrically their inspiration derives from fortune cookies and grumpy cat memes. Don’t miss this functionally dysfunctional band of hooligans." Although it can be exhausting chasing out the woodland creatures for soundcheck, The Salty Suites bring both their incredible playing (including the exquisite voice of Chelsea Williams) with great songwriting for an awesome time.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - THE JANGLE BROS., the band of John York, Billy Darnell & Chad Watson, play the Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N Lake Av, Altadena, CA; phone for reservations, 10 am-10 pm, 7 days, at: 626-798-6236.

* JOHN YORK is a former member of the legendary Byrds, and currently touring with Barry McGuire. He has played with P.F. Sloan, The Mamas and the Papas, Dr. John, Johnny Rivers, Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, The Sir Douglas Quintet, Nicky Hopkins, and Blues legend Lightnin' Hopkins.

* BILLY DARNELL played guitar for the Gene Clark Byrds, The Everly Brothers, Dr. John, Doug Kershaw, and Roger McGuinn, and other notables.

* CHAD WATSON, amazing bass player for Janis Ian, Delaney Bramlett, Charlie Rich, Freddy Fender and countless other artists.

* Tix, $20.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - RICKY Z plus BOBBY BLUEHOUSE BAND play the "Winter Blues Series" at Arcadia Blues Club, 16 E Huntington Dr, Arcadia, CA.

*  Doors at 7; FREE parking behind venue and in nearby city lot.

* Venue has full bar; menu with generous portions, two can share.

* Pool tables, plenty of seating, dance floor space, two stages at opposite ends to keep the music continuous.

*  Fun place, but bring earplugs. Seriously.

* Adv tix at a substantial discount, available for all shows at the venue, at: http://arcadiabluesclub.eventbrite.com

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - "DOWDING THOMAS ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE" at Bar 20, 8462 Sunset Bl, WeHo, CA.

* Quite a lineup, but not sent in a form we can copy.

* More at: www.bar20onsunset.com

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - L.A. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA at The Soraya (formerly San Fernando Valley Performing Arts Center), 18111 Nordhoff St, Northridge, CA  91330; 818-677-8800.

* Celebrated American violinist Jennifer Koh scrapes around the icy edges of Ligeti's avant-garde Violin Concerto, which conductor David Danzmayr bookends with Korngold's Straussiana and Beethoven's Sixth Symphony.

* Tix, $49-$109.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

8 pm - JOHN MAYALL plays The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675; 949-496-8927.

___



Fri, Nov 16:

9 pm - JOHN MAYALL plays The Rose Theatre, 300 E Colorado Bl, Pasadena, CA 91129; 818-879-5016.

___


More in a little while. After you've had a chance to peruse and partake of Friday night.
____________________





That's all for this edition. Stay tuneful!





____________________













<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>







We'll be back again soon with music news and more "News of the Non-Trumpcentric Universe." (c)







+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+







LEGALESE, CONTACTING US, 'N SUCH...







Boilerplate? Where's the main pressure gauge? And the firebox?







What "boilerplate"? Who came up with that goofy term for the basic essential informational stuff...



________________________________







Direct to the Guide's current editions /







MOBILE-DEVICE-FRIENDLY







editions load quickly at



.



www.acousticamericana.blogspot.com



.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



.



CONTACT US -- Post Comments / Send Questions / say Howdy at:







Tiedtothetracks (at) Hotmail (dot) com



.



OR USE THE COMMENTS FUNCTION on the Blogspot site.



.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



Entire contents copyright © 2018,



Lawrence Wines & Tied to the Tracks.



All rights reserved.



<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>



.



♪ The ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE endeavors to bring you NEWS – and views of interest to artists everywhere – more specifically to musicians and the creative community and music makers and fans of acoustic and Folk-Americana music. That includes both traditional and innovative forms. From the deepest roots to today’s acoustic renaissance, that’s our beat. We provide a wealth of resources, including a HUGE catalog of acoustic-friendly venues (now undergoing a major update), and inside info on FESTIVALS and select performances in Southern California in venues from the monumentally large to the intimately small and cozy. We cover workshops, conferences, and other events for artists and folks in the music industry, and all kinds o’ things in the world of acoustic and Americana and accessible classical music. From washtub bass to musical spoons to oboe to viola to banjo to squeezebox, from Djangostyle to new-fangled-old-time string band music, from sweet Cajun fiddle to bluegrass and pre-bluegrass Appalachian mountain music to all the swamp water roots of the blues and the bright lights of where the music is headed now.



.



The Acoustic Americana Music Guide. Thanks for sittin' a spell. The cyber porch'll be here anytime you come back from the road.







<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>-<^>








Thursday, November 15, 2018

Roy Clark Is Gone at Age 85. Thursday, Nov 15 edition.

.
.
LATE ADDITION: MEMORIAL SERVICE TO BE STREAMED LIVE, and the PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND; also HOW TO MAKE GIFTS IN HIS MEMORY...



(This additional report was added Sun, Nov 18, 8:30 pm Pacific time).



"ROY CLARK'S CELEBRATION OF LIFE" Memorial Will Be Held Wednesday Near Tulsa, OK



BROKEN ARROW, Okla. - Plans were announced over the weekend for "Roy Clark's Celebration of Life" memorial which will be open to the public. The service will be held on Wednesday, November 21 at 11 am CT at Rhema Bible Church, 1025 W Kenosha St, Broken Arrow, OK 74012 near Tulsa.



The service will be streamed live at:



www.rhema.org



and on Rhema Bible Church's Facebook Page.



A private, invitation-only visitation for family, friends and fellow performers will take place Tuesday evening.



IN LIEU OF FLOWERS, the family requests that all CONTRIBUTIONS be made to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. For several years, Clark headlined a golf tournament for St. Jude’s, where a floor was named in his honor.



“I see a lot of celebrities come to St. Jude, and you know what’s in a person’s heart by how they entertain the children,” said hospital CEO David McKee. “He was truly touched by the kids, not the cameras.”



Clark saw his helping hand as a responsibility. “I’ve just been so blessed in my life,” he said. “It would be a sin for me to sit there and not share it, and not do something to help others.”



St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105

(800) 822-6344

____________________



A previous UPDATE was added at 1:25 pm Pacific time last Thursday, with TRIBUTES FROM MUSIC STARS added at the bottom of the edition.

The following is what was already published before the above LATE ADDITION.

____________________





He never bought a joke and he didn't read music, but he was a legendary musical giant, filled with good humor everywhere he went.



In announcing the death this morning of banjo legend, musician, and entertainer extraordinaire ROY CLARK, his friend and publicist, Jeremy Westby, began with a life-defining and inspiring quote from Roy himself:



"Before we go any farther, I want to lay somethin' on you; it's not heavy and it's not to imply that you don't already do it. It's just a reminder... to all of us.

 

"The next chance you get, do somethin' nice for somebody - say 'good day,' hold a door open - and don't wait around for a thank you... you don't need it. And because of you, that person will go out and do something nice for somebody, and then that person will go out and do something nice for someone else, and this whole world can wind up doing nice things for each other and we can be the ones that start it.

 

"It takes all of us working together to get things done - no one does it alone. Only One did and I'm not that strong. Let's start it - here's to love - it's still the best!"



 -- Roy Clark.



ROY CLARK, the legendary "superpicker," whose many honors included music's top awards -- he was a GRAMMY, CMA, and ACM award winner, "Country Music Hall of Fame" and Grand Ole Opry member -- and co-host of the famed "Hee Haw" television series, died today at the age of 85. His death, at home in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was due to complications from pneumonia.



Roy Clark gained success in a decade that otherwise defied artists in his genre. While his "Hee Haw" co-host, the late BUCK OWENS, rode the crest of the niche-market "Bakersfield Sound" wave, and a few, including GRAM PARSONS, and THE NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND owned one end of what was once a diverse rock-and-roll spectrum, it was Roy who attracted and won those audiences while holding the hearts of what we now call the fan bases of "trad country" and Acoustic Americana.



ROY CLARK pioneered the way for artists to find or create their own niches within genres long ago abandoned by the monotonously soundalike commerciality of corporate music. From the signature place claimed by JOHN DENVER to musical landscapes visited by NEIL YOUNG, to a couple dozen other famous artists we could name, fans of today's purveyors of roots-inspired acoustic instrumental brilliance all owe a debt to Roy.



And publicist Westby contends, "it can be summed up in one word — sincerity."



Sure, Roy Clark was one of the world’s finest multi-instrumentalists, and one of the first crossover artists to land singles on both the pop and country charts. And years later, he was the pioneer who turned Branson, Missouri, into what is arguably the live music capitol of the world -- the Ozark town today boasts more seats than Broadway.



And, yes, Roy's talents are largely responsible for making "Hee Haw" the longest-running syndicated show in television history. The reruns currently air multiple times every week on RFD-TV.



But the bottom line in understanding Roy Clark was the honest warmth he gave to his audiences.



BOB HOPE summed it up when he told Roy, “Your face is like a fireplace.”



Roy, the man who was a frequent guest-host for JOHNNY CARSON on "The Tonight Show" in addition to starring on "Hee Haw" for 24 years, had a keen sense about sending-out that sincere warmth:



“A TV camera goes right through your soul,” said Roy. He continued, “If you’re a bad person, people pick that up. I’m a firm believer in smiles. I used to believe that everything had to be a belly laugh. But I’ve come to realize that a real sincere smile is mighty powerful.”



Some might observe that family-friendly entertainer Roy Clark can be credited with playing the first recurring gay character on television. That seems worthy of gasps and certain disbelief in the conservative world of country music. But it's a fact. Years before BILLY CRYSTAL's character on "Soap," Roy did almost weekly sketches as the front-desk proprietor of the "Empty Arms Hotel" on "Hew Haw." That flamboyant character was usually the foil for the written-to-be-dumb remarks or attitudes portrayed by the others in scenes that ranged from cornpone to enduringly clever.



For a man who didn’t taste major success until he was 30, the key was not some grand plan, but rather taking everything in its own time.



“Sure,” he said, “I had dreams of being a star when I was 18. I could’ve pushed it too, but it wouldn’t have happened any sooner. I’m lucky. What’s happened has happened in spite of me.”



In fact, that’s what Clark titled his autobiography, "My Life — In Spite of Myself!" written with Marc Elliot (Simon & Shuster, 1994).



He expressed some of the same themes when The Guide interviewed him in the 21st century. (We're looking for the story and notes in the archive.)



Roy's book reminded many that there is much more to Roy Clark than fast fingers and a quick wit.



That he was raised in Washington, D.C., often surprises people. Born Roy Linwood Clark on April 15, 1933 in Meherrin, Virginia, his family moved to D.C. when he was a youngster. His father played in a square dance band.



He also took young Roy to free concerts that are still ubiquitous in the Nation's Capital. For Roy and his musician dad, that included performances presented by the National Symphony and various military bands.



Roy remembered, "I was subjected to different kinds of music before I ever played. Dad said, 'Never turn your ear off to music until your heart hears it -- because then you might hear something you like.'"



Sort of a prototype mantra for what so many Folk-Americana musicians tell big labels and corporate radio syndicates today.



Beginning on banjo and mandolin, Roy was one of those people "born with the music already in them." His first guitar, a Sears Silvertone, came as a Christmas present when he was 14.



That same year, 1947, he made his first TV appearance on a medium that was then brand-new.



He was 15 when he earned $2 for his first paid performance, with his dad's band.



In the fertile, diverse musical soil of cosmopolitan D.C., he began playing bars and dives on Friday and Saturday nights until he was playing every night and skipping school. Eventually he dropped-out at the tender age of 15, something that rarely leads to any kind of success.



"Music was my salvation, the thing I loved most and did best. Whatever was fun, I'd go do that," wrote Roy. The difference was his obvious talent and instrumental prowess, along with that warm charisma.



The guitar wizard soon went on tour with country legends, including HANK WILLIAMS and GRANDPA JONES. After winning a national banjo competition in 1950, he was invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry, which led to shows with RED FOLEY and ERNEST TUBB.



Yet he'd always return to D.C. to play not only country, but jazz, pop, and early rock 'n' roll. On that last point, he's prominently featured in the recent book, "Capitol Rock." In D.C., he could and did play with black groups and white groups in a time when no one did, and it was considered scandalous.



For Roy, that meant he could play fast, and even play guitar with his feet.



In 1954, he joined JIMMY DEAN & THE TEXAS WILDCATS, appearing in clubs and on radio and TV, and even backing up ELVIS PRESLEY.



But in 1960, he was 27 and still scrambling. An invitation to open for WANDA JACKSON at then internationally renowned Golden Nugget in Las Vegas proved to be his big break.



That led to his own tour. He was on the road for 345 straight nights at one stretch. When he returned to Vegas in 1962, he came back as a headliner and recording star, with his debut album, "The Lightning Fingers Of Roy Clark."



The next year, 1963, he had his first hit, "The Tips of My Fingers," a country song that featured an orchestra and string section.



"We didn't call it crossover then but I guess that's what it was," Roy later observed. He continued, "We didn't aim for that, because if you aim for both sides you miss them both. But we just wanted to be believable."



There's that trademark sincerity and authenticity again.



It was there in the vinyl grooves of that record. And it came through even better on TV.



His first appearances on the small screen were in 1963, on "The Tonight Show" and "American Bandstand." Both showcased his easygoing attitude and rural sense of humor.



That remained a key to his showmanship. "Humor is a blessing to me. My earliest recollections are of looking at something and seeing the lighter side. But it's always spontaneous. I couldn't write a comedy skit for someone else," Roy said.



Throughout the '60s, Roy Clark recorded several albums, toured constantly, and appeared on all the TV variety shows of the time, from Carson to Mike Douglas to Flip Wilson.



"I was the token bumpkin," he joked, continuing, "It became, 'Let's get that Clark guy. He's easy to get along with.'"



Then came "Hee Haw." Conceived as a countrified "Laugh-In" with music, and shot in Nashville, "Hee Haw" premiered in 1969. Co-starring Clark and Buck Owens, it was an immediate hit.



Though CBS canceled the show after two-and-a-half years -- despite its ranking in the Top 20 -- the series immediately found a home in syndication, still producing new episodes. It remained there until 1992.



"I long ago realized it was not a figure of speech when people come up to me and say they grew up watching me since they were 'that big'," indicating some period of early childhood, noted Roy.



A generation or two also grew-up listening to him. In 1969, "Yesterday, When I Was Young" charted in the Top-20 Pop chart, and hit #9 on the Country Billboard chart.



Including that first hit, Roy Clark went on to have 23 Top-40 country hits. Among them were eight Top 10s:



• "The Tips Of My Fingers" (#10, 1963)

• "I Never Picked Cotton" (#5)

• "Thank God And Greyhound You're Gone" (#6, 1970)

• "The Lawrence Welk-Hee Haw Counter Revolution Polka" (#9, 1972)

• "Come Live With Me" (#1)

• "Somewhere Between Love And Tomorrow" (#2, 1973)

• "If I Had It To Do All Over Again" (#2, 1976)



In addition, his 12-string guitar rendition of "Malaguena" is considered a classic and, in 1982, he won a GRAMMY for "Best Country Instrumental Performance" for "Alabama Jubilee."



A consummate musician, no matter the genre, he co-starred with PETULA CLARK at Caesar's Palace, became the first country artist to headline at the "Montreux International Jazz Festival," and appeared in London on "The Tom Jones Show."



Clark was amazed when guitarists from England credited his BBC specials and performances on variety TV shows with the likes of the JACKSON 5 for inspiring them to play.



But Roy always said the highlight of his career was a pioneering, sold-out 1976 tour of the then-Soviet Union: "Even though they didn't know the words, there were tears in their eyes when I played 'Yesterday.' ['Yesterday, When I Was Young'.] Folks there said we wouldn't realize in our lifetime the good we'd accomplished, just because of our pickin' around."



When he returned in 1988 to now-Russia, Clark was hailed as a hero.



Though he always said he "never bought a joke and doesn't read music," as key self-descriptions, he was proud of both.



The "hillbilly singer" was that rare entertainer with deserved acclaim and popularity that proved worthy of respect from his fellow professionals and many intersecting "publics," that combined to bring him:


• a star on the "Hollywood Walk of Fame."

• eight GRAMMY nominations and one win

• the Academy of Country Music's "Pioneer Award"

• membership in the "Gibson (Guitar) Hall of Fame"

• the first country artist inducted into the Las Vegas

 "Entertainers Hall of Fame"

•  induction as the 63rd member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1987 in Nashville

• induction in 1987 in Carnegie Hall

• induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2009

• and more



Roy’s many good deeds on behalf of his fellow man led to him receiving the 1999 "Minnie Pearl Humanitarian of the Year Award" from TNN’s "Music City News Awards."



In October, 2000, he was inducted into the "Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame," and until his death, he was actively involved with school children who attend the Roy Clark Elementary School in Tulsa, Okla.



When we saw him perform at a "Huck Finn Jubilee" bluegrass festival when it was still on the narrows of the Mojave River in the California Desert, his joy of making music with young people took sudden center stage.



Roy's headlining set was preceded by elementary school musicians from a program sponsored by a Southern California bluegrass program in cooperation with a local school district. The kids segment included both a group performance and an exhibition by the fifth and sixth grade top students.



Roy was spotted backstage chatting with the top 6th grade fiddlers.



Then, in the midst of his own set, he brought the kid onstage, to perform a duet. Then, he gave the kid a solo.



Obvious lifetime memory for one 6th grader, and everyone there must wonder where that kid is now.



It was rather risky for a star like Roy. He didn't really know what the kid could do, beyond one well-practiced exhibition piece. Not that it could have damaged Roy's reputation had it not gone well. But it was going to be remembered, no matter what.



Still, by all accounts, that was Roy.



From his home in Tulsa, where he moved in 1974 with Barbara, his wife of 61 years, Clark continued to tour extensively. For him — and for his legion of loyal fans — live performance was what it was all about.



“Soon as you hit the edge of the stage and see people smiling and know they’re there to hear you, it’s time to have fun. I keep a band of great young people around me, and we’re not musically restrained. It’s not about ‘let’s do it correct’ but ‘let’s do it right,’” he said of his lifelong approach to taking the stage.



At the end of each of Roy’s concerts, he would tell the audience, “We had to come, but you had a choice. Thanks for being here.”



With responding smiles, audiences continued to thank Roy for being there, too.



Roy was preceded in death by his beloved grandson Elijah Clark who passed at the age of fourteen on September 24, 2018. Roy is survived by Barbara, his wife of sixty-one years, his sons Roy Clark II and wife Karen, Dr. Michael Meyer and wife Robin, Terry Lee Meyer, Susan Mosier and Diane Stewart, and his grandchildren: Brittany Meyer, Michael Meyer, Caleb Clark, Josiah Clark, and his sister, Susan Coryell.



The Guide offers our condolences and sympathy to all his loved ones.

A memorial celebration will be held in the coming days in Tulsa, Okla., details are being arranged.

___

The Guide expresses our thanks to Jeremy Westby, Sandy Brokaw, and 2911 Media for information and quotes used in this story.

We will add video links of Roy's performances later today in this space, and insert a note at the top of this edition when they are added.

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Meanwhile, the TRIBUTES are pouring in...

"Roy Clark was one of the greatest ever. His spirit will never die. I loved him dearly and he will be missed." – Dolly Parton

"When I came to Nashville, Roy was one of my favorite stars. I loved the way he hosted the CMA's and Hee Haw. It was always an honor to be on the same stage with him. I am already missing Roy's big smile." – Crystal Gayle

"The Halsey family’s hearts are filled with gratitude for the many years (59) of friendship and business association. He was a rare combination of talent and generosity. Roy Clark brought a special kind of healing to the world. He will be missed by the multitudes. – Jim Halsey, friend and manager

"My story is not unique. How many guitar players started with a Roy Clark guitar method book? How many guitars were sold to people wanting to play because of him? How many lives were made better because of his wit and joy? I’m one of so many." – @BradPaisley

"When the Nashville floods wiped out most of my guitars, Roy heard about it & showed up at a show and gave me one of his. This is who this man was. Constantly giving. I owe him so much. Go say hi to my Papaw for me Roy. You left the world a much better place. #royclark" – @BradPaisley

"Roy Clark shaped my path. My Papaw introduced me to his music as a toddler. Every Saturday we’d watch Hee Haw. My first guitar book was a Roy Clark guitar method. I practiced his style, then practiced making his facial expressions. He was a hero. And so many have the same story." – @BradPaisley

"I remember Roy as a great musician and singer. But more than that, he was a great human being. Always laughing, always uplifting to those around him. Doing shows with Roy on Hee Haw was such a wonderful experience. There is a vacant spot in Nashville now that he is gone. RIP Roy Clark" – Lee Greenwood

"Getting to REALLY know Roy Clark is one of highlights of my country career. I first met him on HEE HAW and the went on to do dozens of shows with him over the years. He was a good friend, we laughed a lot together and he loved Duke's mayonnaise on his tomato sandwiches." – T. Graham Brown

"My first CMA memory is sitting on my living room floor watching Roy Clark tear it up. Sending my love and respect to him and his family for all he did. - KU" - @KeithUrban

"Just got word that Roy Clark has passed. I’ve known him for 60 years and he was a fine musician and entertainer Rest In Peace Buddy, you will be remembered" – @CharlieDaniels

"Roy, thank you for always spreading laughter, kindness, and positivity. We'll keep it goin' for ya!" – @Opry

"Just heard Hee Haw Star / Super Picker #RoyClark just passed away. Saw him last when we filmed #CountrysFamilyReunion He was always so kind. Heaven gained another amazing addition to the Angel Band. Rest In Peace Roy" – @RhondaVincent13

"I had the honor of playing with Roy Clark on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry and many times and on the television series Hee Haw. I looked up to Roy; he was the consummate entertainer. But the things I will remember most about Roy are his big, over-the-top, cheesy grin, and how, from the moment I met him, he made me feel like I had known him forever. Roy Clark was a good man... the real deal." – Tim Atwood

"Rest In Peace friend, brother, mentor .... Roy Clark ..." – @OakRidgeBoys

"Growing up watching #HeeHaw, I knew nobody could pick-&-grin like the great #RoyClark. And his #YesterdayWhenIWasYoung is one of the great songs of Country or any kind of music. A true legend. We will miss him. #RIP" - Terry Fator

"Wonderful Roy Clark was a great talent & a kind & gentle man. We had so much fun singing & dancing together. My love goes out to his family & friends. #royclark #rip" – @TheMitziGaynor

"We're sorry to hear about the passing of Roy Clark. Roy Clark made best use of his incredible talent. He was both a showman and a virtuoso, with a love of music that beamed across air waves and into millions of living rooms, where families gathered to watch and listen." – @countrymusichof

"R.I.P. Roy Clark. Oh man so many memories growing up with him on hee haw. Another part of my childhood that made growing up the way I did awesome. Hee Haw, Johnny Carson, Paul Harvey among others are everywhere in my memory bank. He lived a long great life and I thank him. SALUTE" – @GitRDoneLarry

"Roy Clark was a very sweet Man that loved Jesus and country music. Heaven just got a great picker! Can’t wait to see him do some pickin’ and grinnin’ on them heavenly hay bales." – @GitRDoneLarry

"Roy's passing is overwhelming. It is truly the end of an era. Roy was Big Daddy for all of us. And for those of us who were blessed to know him as a friend and work with him, it hurts so deeply. He made so many of our careers possible. It offsets the deep anguish of his passing to know he is free from any suffering now and that his great talents are with us forever on the thousands of TV episodes, recordings and in our memories. His huge contribution to the music business and to so many of us personally is etched in our hearts forever. America loves Roy and we will all bless his memory, honor him and thank him forever. He was truly one of God’s good ones." - Jana Jae

"23 years ago, Roy Clark changed my life in an instant. It is hard to put it into words, but from the moment we first encountered each other, he knew me, believed in me and took it upon himself to give me great opportunities that otherwise would never have been possible. I can only be so grateful that I had a chance in my life to reconnect with him and tell him personally exactly what he had done for me all those years ago. The other great blessing is that I was given an opportunity to develop a meaningful friendship with this man over the last few years. It brings me great peace. I would play for him, and he would just smile and become so genuinely excited. Again, at just the right moment in my life, he became a great encourager. Roy has left a lasting impact on my life. For over 20 years I’ve been telling people the stories of how he changed my life...and I will never forget." – Kyle Dillingham

"Our deepest condolences to the family of Roy Clark. Country music has lost another giant – well-loved both for his unique talents and his generous, kind-hearted spirit." – @OfficialRFDTV

"My friend of 46 years is gone and I am heartbroken. He could make me laugh like no other and now he makes me cry. His music will live forever and now the angels in heaven are picking and grinning. I love you always dear friend." - Misty Rowe

"RIP Roy Clark, was an honor to pick and sing with you" – @raybensonaatw


____________________





That's all for this edition. Stay tuneful!





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What "boilerplate"? Who came up with that goofy term for the basic essential informational stuff...



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♪ The ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE endeavors to bring you NEWS – and views of interest to artists everywhere – more specifically to musicians and the creative community and music makers and fans of acoustic and Folk-Americana music. That includes both traditional and innovative forms. From the deepest roots to today’s acoustic renaissance, that’s our beat. We provide a wealth of resources, including a HUGE catalog of acoustic-friendly venues (now undergoing a major update), and inside info on FESTIVALS and select performances in Southern California in venues from the monumentally large to the intimately small and cozy. We cover workshops, conferences, and other events for artists and folks in the music industry, and all kinds o’ things in the world of acoustic and Americana and accessible classical music. From washtub bass to musical spoons to oboe to viola to banjo to squeezebox, from Djangostyle to new-fangled-old-time string band music, from sweet Cajun fiddle to bluegrass and pre-bluegrass Appalachian mountain music to all the swamp water roots of the blues and the bright lights of where the music is headed now.



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The Acoustic Americana Music Guide. Thanks for sittin' a spell. The cyber porch'll be here anytime you come back from the road.







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Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Urgent: Help End US Role in War / Famine in Yemen. Special edition, Tue, Nov 13 2018.

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REPORT ON THE OUTCOME -- after publishing our story and call for action

HERE'S WHAT HAPPENED...

The effort LOST in the House of Representatives to defeat the sneaky "rule" that was, in effect, a self-destruct mechanism added into a bill that was originally intended to END U.S. support for the war on Yemen. The lame-duck outgoing Speaker of the House won his effort to protect the militarists of the warconomy, so they can continue to profit by supplying bombs, missiles, and other deadly ordnance to the Saudi regime for its continuing slaughter of civilians in Yemen.
______

Akbar Shahid Ahmed summed it up clearly:

@AkbarSAhmed

"Republicans have succeeded in their two-day effort to kill an attempt to debate Yemen in the House. Focus now goes to the Senate, where a similar bill is up later this month, and to what Dems do once they take charge in January."

______

Tweeted by Rep. (Representative, as in Congressman) Ro Khanna:

@RepRoKhanna

"It’s shameful that @SpeakerRyan and House Republicans denied Congress the chance to do our constitutional duty while millions of lives are at stake in Yemen. History will remember this abdication of duty."

______

Bennett Clark wrote:

@BennettGClark

Yemen: bombing + blockade = famine

______

The Guide will inform our readers, either through additional original reporting, or links to trustworthy coverage, when or if any progress is made in ending America's illegal (by international law) and unconstitutional (by the supreme law of the U.S.) participation in the war and war-caused epidemics of diseases and massive famine in Yemen.

We wish it could have come out better and we express our thanks to our readers who joined us in calling their Member of Congress.

___________________

Here is our original report...
___


No,we are NOT converting our arts & music publication into a politics or foreign policy site. BUT, so many in the arts community are frequently expressing concern over Yemen, and this is a SINGULAR AND URGENT OPPORTUNITY TO END THAT WAR. BUT now, in a last-minute act of subterfuge, the pro-war lackeys are trying to sabotage things overnight. (Literally, OVERNIGHT.)

How can you and I make a difference and STOP THEM? EASY. IMPORTANT, BUT EASY: Phone your Member of Congress WEDNESDAY MORNING. The vote is Wednesday afternoon, D.C. time, and noon Eastern is 9 am Pacific. So you need to do this first thing Wednesday morning.

Because of miserable political shenanigans, a "rule" vote is set to protect the blatantly illegal US war funding and support of Saudi Arabia's brutal war on the civilian population of Yemen.

So, in Congress, a vote against the rule is a vote against the war, and we need to tell the Members of Congress,

"VOTE NO ON THE RULE - and END THE YEMEN WAR!"

CALL 202-225-3121

Here's the whole story:

Just a short while ago, Tuesday evening D.C. time, there was a classic Nixonian-dirty-tricks maneuver of the Washington swamp. Though voted-out last Tuesday, Paul Ryan is still the House Speaker through the end of the year, and his GOP big shots still rule all the committees.

And they're in rare form with a baffle-the-people-BS-game. Ryan's House Rules Committee just approved a rule for turning something good into something that would do exactly the opposite. That rule would "alter consideration" of H.R. 6784, the “Manage our Wolves Act.”

Specifically -- and Here's where they're trying to undo the good -- that "rule" would “de-privilege” H. Con. Res. 138, the Khanna-Massie-Smith-Jones-Pocan. That "138" legislation, the "Yemen War Powers Resolution" would END unconstitutional U.S. participation in the Saudi regime’s war-blockade-famine-genocide in Yemen. The full House is still expected to vote on the floor Wednesday afternoon on this rule. BUT... it now includes the Speaker's "rule" that would kill it. Meaning, if this rule for the consideration of the “Manage our Wolves Act” passes, then H. Con. Res. 138 would be stripped of its “privilege” -- and that means it would be stripped of its War Powers Resolution guarantee of a clean, up-or-down, vote on the House floor.

Yes, It's complicated. But remember that lawmakers are mostly all lawyers who go to school to learn how to do these things.

The bad news becomes obvious when you know that.

Here’s the good news: a vote against the rule is a vote against the war, and although it won’t be easy, it’s possible that all of us who want the war against Yemen STOPPED could influence enough Members of Congress, and win the vote against the rule. And that's not a far-fetched hope.

All or almost all Democrats will almost surely vote against the rule. A handful of Republicans will almost surely vote against the rule. All that's needed to defeat the rule is for two handfuls of Republicans to vote against the rule.

By comparison, the last time the House took a clean, up-or-down, vote on U.S. participation in the Saudi regime's war in Yemen, it was June 2016. It narrowly lost, 204-216, on an amendment to prohibit the transfer of cluster bombs to the Saudi regime. 40 Republicans voted for the antiwar amendment, and 200 Republicans voted against the antiwar amendment. 164 Democrats voted for that amendment, and 16 Democrats voted against it.

In other words: if we can get all House Democrats to vote "no" on the self-destruct rule -- which should be relatively straightforward, if they simply do what they always claim they're doing -- then we only need about 15% of the House Republicans to oppose the rule, and that is enough to defeat the rule. Yes, getting 15% of House Republicans to oppose the sneaky rule will be the hard part. Hard, but after the election just went the way it did, this is not impossible.

HERE'S WHAT YOU CAN DO TO STOP THE WAR IN YEMEN: call your Member of Congress tomorrow morning when the House offices are open (beginning at 6 am, Pacific time) and urge your Representative -- regardless of their political party, or yours -- to VOTE NO ON THE RULE, because you want them to END THE WAR IN YEMEN. If you can’t call in the morning, then CALL NOW and navigate the Capitol's voice mail system.

The Capitol Switchboard is 202-225-3121.

If you agree with us, call tomorrow morning or call now. When you reach a staffer or leave a message, you can say something like:

“I strongly urge you to VOTE NO ON THE RULE for consideration of the Manage our Wolves Act. A yes vote on the rule for consideration of the Manage our Wolves Act is a vote to continue helping the Saudi regime starve children in Yemen. A no vote on the rule is a vote to restore our Constitution, which assigns Congress, not the President, the sole power to decide when to take our country to war. End the Yemen war. Vote NO on the rule.”

Call tomorrow morning or call now if you want to end US participation in a war that is causing the greatest famine of our time.

Our thanks to Robert Naiman of the "Just Foreign Policy" organization. (That's "Just" like in justice.) You can learn more on this issue and other points of US foreign policy that either deserve support or opposition at their website, which we are happy to recommend. It's http://www.justforeignpolicy.org

Yes, you CAN make a difference in ways you never think about. You know that's true, because YOU DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE when you learn what's at stake and you choose to take a part!

If anyone tells you "Don't bother! They're gonna do what they want, anyway," just mention to them that the House flipped because of last week's election. And invite them to watch you and learn, because,

THIS IS WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE!

Whether the rich interests of the warconomy like it or not.

___

The Guide waives our copyright on this edition, provided it is shared intact. We do that to encourage sharing, with the available time so short, after the House Speaker's last-minute Tuesday night shady deal.
___


Saturday, November 10, 2018

VETERANS DAY / WW I 100th ANNIVERSARY ARMISTICE DAY ON TV.

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LAST UPDATED:

MONDAY morning, Nov 12th.
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This edition is specific to ARMISTICE DAY and VETERANS DAY and includes our feature story AND a Guide to TV specials commemorating the end of WW I, 100 years ago today, and other Veterans Day commemorations.

A DIFFERENT EDITION is also current. It's...



"EVENTS while Reeling from Tragedy, Amidst Fire & Smoke"

THAT edition has the LIVE MUSIC EVENTS and the NEWS.



That edition includes FESTIVALS this weekend, and Southern Cal live events you can attend, including the Nov 11th ARMISTICE DAY / VETERANS DAY event aboard BATTLESHIP IOWA, docked as a museum in San Pedro.



Scroll down to get that edition, or click in the sidebar at left, or go directly there at:



https://acousticamericana.blogspot.com/2018/11/events-while-reeling-from-tragedy.html


__________


Our feature story is updated to have the same final text as it has elsewhere, including as the Sunday morning lead feature in the L.A. Progressive.
___


WHY THIS NOVEMBER 11th SHOULD ALTER OUR LEADERS' SENSIBILITIES


Today marks 100 years since the "war to end all wars"


by Larry Wines


First, for those who would like to get out and find respite from wildfires and smoke, you can head for San Pedro. Today the annual Veterans Day event includes a special observance for Armistice Day aboard the Battleship Iowa, docked as a museum near the cruise ship terminal, at 250 S. Harbor Blvd., San Pedro, CA 90731. Active military and veterans are welcomed aboard free today. Information phone is (877) 446-9261, and their website is https://pacificbattleship.com
___

Also, we have an added Sunday event for you, "ARMISTICE DAY CENTENNIAL: THE SOLDIER-POETS OF WORLD WAR I" with folksinger ROSS ALTMAN and poets SHERMAN PEARL and MICHAEL C. FORD and more, at Beyond Baroque in Venice, 7 pm. See the full description in the Guide's events listing for a full description, in the weekend's companion edition, at the url up top.

We also added two MONDAY notes for you:
One is the annual "VETERANS DAY COMMEMORATION" that includes a Civil War re-enactment encampment, and unveiling of the new "Gold Star Families Memorial Monument," at the Reagan Presidential Library & Museum, 40 Presidential Dr, Simi Valley, CA 93065. The keynote speaker is the sole-surviving Medal of Honor US Marine from WWII.
SECOND is the online on-demand  "DEMOCRACY NOW" Nov 12 program's feature with historic looks back at Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, Jane Addams, "Honoring Antiwar Resisters on the 100th Anniv. of WWI’s End." It's online at:
https://www.democracynow.org/2018/11/12/emma_goldman_eugene_debs_jane_addams

Now, back to our feature story, as published in multiple places.
___

Now, let's look at why today isn't another typical Veterans Day, and the messages it holds for us if we'll just get our leaders to listen. Then we'll conclude with all the special programming on TV, which tellingly enough, is all in rather out-of-the-way places.

Today, Sunday, November 11th, marks the concurrent observance of both the annual day for all veterans, and the singular centennial of the Armistice. "The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" in 1918 brought cessation of the killing in the most massive melee of carnage the world had ever known, to that time. It took a full year for November 11th to become known as "Armistice Day." From there, after WW II and Korea, the date was renamed to be observed as Veterans Day for all living U.S. military veterans. Those who have passed are traditionally honored on Memorial Day in May. Though those lines keep blurring.

It's rather shocking that there is no special programming scheduled today on any of the major networks for either the 100th anniversary of the armistice or Veterans Day. That should scream volumes for all of us.

Consider the words of George Santayana:

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

Indeed, if there was ever a day when the screening of a film for the broadest possible audience should be demanded, it should be 1930's "All Quiet on the Western Front," and it should be this November 11th. But it's not on any cable or broadcast schedule. Neither is "Gallipoli."

World War One slaughtered millions. It was the first mechanized war, the first war to use weapons of mass destruction, the first to make large-scale use of the airplane, and the first to use it as a killing machine. It was the first conflict to employ the submarine with its stealthy, self-propelled torpedoes, and the first to use very-long-range artillery firing massive shells. It brought the machine gun which made any space of any kind instantly deadly, and it brought the insidious threat of nearly silent chemical weapons that caused grotesque death.

It also slaughtered millions of horses. The steeds would remain the primary means of military transport into the opening years of the Second World War. And from 1914-1918, horse cavalry would still charge onto the battlefield, and into machine guns. The realities of technology colliding with romanticized notions of heroic bravery simply left carnage everywhere, without compromise, without escape, and nearly always without much opportunity for any shred of victory.

World War One was, as an official U.S. Army film in 1960 characterized it, "An agonizing war of stalemate" that ultimately could only be ended in an-all-sides-stop-shooting armistice. Interesting that idea was in the 1960 Army consciousness, but not in the army lexicon as events of the '60s began to transpire. Or forty years after that, when the commanders enthusiastically embraced the invasion and occupation of Iraq without considering the consequences.

The battlefields of the Great War should still have echoed with the screams of those who had been butchered amidst their thousands of miles of barbed wire and lunar landscapes. They were in no way places of glory.

Bodies were buried in the side walls of battlefield trenches. Sticking your head or anything else over the top of the trench got it blown off. Thus, the bottoms of trenches became awash in urine, feces, blood, rainwater, vomit, cartridge boxes, spent shells, irretrievably soiled clothing items, discarded food that no one could eat, living and dead rats by the millions, residues of mustard gas absorbed into the putrid liquidity, and the stench of the unwashed living and the putricine and cadaverine gases erupting from the decaying dead.

Unable to get their feet dry or stand above the toxic soupiness, among the ways they suffered -- in a time before penicillin or antibiotics -- was from "Trenchfoot." If they were lucky, it could hospitalize them -- and if that temporary deliverance came before gang green got them -- they could medical attention without amputations.

In the trenches, where staying bent-over was the necessary posture to keep your head down, most of them were barely able to stand on their feet, anyway. Yet sometimes many thousands had to mobilize, shoulder their packs, tightly fasten their helmet straps, hoist gear and rifle, and command their disease-ridden feet to haul them out of the comparative safety of the hell of the trenches to run for their lives across deadly tortured landscapes.

Yes, they did indeed go "over the top" of their protective trenches. Sometimes days or weeks between such suicidal assaults, sometimes every few minutes for days on end. They simple did it, every time the sergeants were ordered to blow the whistles, worn on cords around their mud-caked, sunburned, infected necks that were racked with bacterial skin infections. And each time they did go forth en masse, the population of No-Man's Land grew by thousands more dead bodies and temporary populations of unreachable wounded who were bleeding to death after being very personally invaded by machine gun bullets.

In the Great War's aftermath, it was widely accepted that future war would be impossible. That was an earnest but futile effort to distill sanity from man's descent into darkness.

Every major nation had looked into the faces of the surviving sparse populations of entire towns that had no remaining male residents of reproductive age. Civic and national leaders had been forced to quantify the cost of disabled former soldiers after the mass maimings from billions of bullets and millions of artillery shells, and from the new cause of carnage, the aerial bomb, plus those permanently disabled from poison gas. And now, the lack of sources for tax collections spelled insolvency in the wake of such incalculable mass destruction of human life, cities, natural lands, farm and pasture lands, rivers, fisheries, and civilization itself.

Woodrow Wilson had envisioned it as "the war to make the world safe for democracy." Recruiting had been done by all sides for "the war to end all wars." And, in the close aftermath, they all knew in their own time that every wishful, chivalrous, idealistic assumption was horribly, tragically wrong.

They knew, but the world quickly forgot. A global economic depression brought hopelessness and desperation. It would produce a reset button. Blaming somebody else was invoked, and it worked then, on enough of the masses, just as it always works now. "Betrayal" became the reason for Germany's loss, even as crushingly impossible reparations payments remained due to the victorious European allies. International treaties and agreements began to fall by the wayside. Defenseless African nations became serfs as the militarily powerful usurped their natural resources.

Sometimes flagrant abandonment or abrogation of treaties become causes for populist celebration led by nationalists celebrating their own superiority -- certainly THEY would not be subservient to mere agreements with others who are undeserving and therefore inferior, anyway. The League of Nations, post-WW I predecessor to the U.N., found its ability to accomplish anything was illusory in the absence of the U.S. Perhaps that echoes with the American administration's abandonment of the multilateral "Iran Deal."

A new world order would come into existence after the profiteers of yet another world war built insurmountable power for themselves. An ever-growing warconomy -- far more massive than the Lost Generation could have imagined -- kept growing. Now, in its righteous might, it takes the lion's share of wealth and power in our 21st century empire of military-industrial-cybersecurity in the name of "protecting you" while maintaining a petroleum-control paradigm. In exchange for a rigged economy based on that holy need of "protecting-us-from-terrorists," we get the safety of runaway, disposable, and ever-trendy consumerism based on continuous growth, on a planet of finite resources, meaning we must appropriate somebody else's to keep things going. Remember, just after 9-11 we had a president tell us all that to "Fight back," we should "Go shopping."

Thus, the carnage of evermore wars fought to make war obsolete have given us a pseudo-peacetime, low-level state of perpetual war with evermore wealth concentrated into ever fewer hands.

And, while enduring a media fascinated with Royal Babies, nobody ever takes time to look back at the European crown heads of state who started World War I in 1914. We should, since all of them were literally members of the same family, vying for more power and control and ostentatious wealth and bragging rights and more badass militaries than their fellow elitist peers.

Our acceptance of being bombarded with the daily overwhelming array of distractions and diversions produced by corporate media -- in concert with the malevolent greed of those who manipulatively control social media -- should sense a parallel. Living today with a dominant power elite isn't all that different from Europe's early 20th-century aristocracy with its sense of entitlement to rule everything and everyone, including wielding the power of life and death. Most Americans have no idea that World War One's carnage directly precipitated the Russian Revolution, in response to elitists getting everybody killed.

We just don't think about anything like that. We are directed, by carefully crafted distraction, away from doing that. Thus we have, in the words of the song, become comfortably numb. We accept, or perhaps in our short-attention-span modern-ness, we simply ignore anything that's too challenging or too complicated or distracts too much from the structured distractions. If you read anything that offers an analysis in depth, don't forward it. Everyone will message you back, "TLTR." Too Long to Read.

So, just join "The Resistance," and something you don't like will get collective ire from others who really don't need to understand it. You're supporting what they don't like and you don't need to understand their needs or concerns or pet peeves, so it's all good.

We tell ourselves that the "olden days" were populated with unsophisticates who didn't even wear hundred-dollar running shoes and must have been helpless without the internet. Even as the premises of the distracting lunacies we embrace are so easily inciting our collective emotions, and so seldom activate our collective intellect.

In 1918 as now, anything can become a cause du jour, simply by being commonly, unquestioningly, or even willingly embraced. Of course that means we, as a nation and as individuals, often know we’ve been had by jumping into something without looking first. Yet we are quick to forgive our mistakes without learning from them.

We protest those who deny the new menace of climate change, but fail utterly to avoid mistakes made before, even as they are made again in our time, because we do not reckon with the lessons of our bloody past. It's TLTR.

The prominent missed points include a plethora of lessons available in the simple embrace of reality. That means remembering the hubris and egos and greed and carnage and power taken by the elite, all forming the matrix of failures of 100 years ago.

We should listen to the voices of those who survived a time that went through this. Those voices call to us from, yes, another time. But it is a relevance that begs to reach us. There are thoughtful voices there that are not on the pop charts, not strutting red carpets flaunting silly tattoos as they sell overpriced fashions made in sweat shops. They are voices that are not shouting insults to crowds wanting slogans instead of solutions. Humanity has been there, done that, if we took the time to see how it came out last time.

After World War One, there was importance placed on hearing the voices of the Lost. A Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was built at Arlington and received a 24/7 honor guard that gently marches through all weather. Following each subsequent war, the remains of another unknown were interred with the first resident. DNA makes it unlikely that new conflicts will add to the honorees, and that may play into the downgrading of importance we are supposed to place on our 21st century military invasions. But the original idea of listening to those whose voices were silenced in the wars we sent them to fight should mean something to us. In the case of the original Unknown person, reading the inscriptions and the speeches made at the time tells us that honoring those remains was intended to help keep us out of trouble.

The people of the Great War could speak to us of a civilization in extremis in so many ways. Even of how disease can run rampant through a society obsessed with doing everything in a hurry to maximize profits. Like eliminating simple measures that slow things down. Including things that protect food supplies and public health. They could tell us that more people died worldwide from the Great Flu Epidemic of 1918 than were killed in the Great War.

The consciousness and sensibilities of the Doughboys and other nations' survivors were so affected that by the 1920s, they came to be known as "The Lost Generation." Yet despite all they had experienced -- including what we know now as PTSD and they called "Shell Shock" --and the physical, emotional and mental traumas they bore, it was an era when medical science knew nothing of how to treat much of any of it.

Still, none of them conducted mass murders like traumatized veterans do in our more comfortable time.

Killers of their postwar era were Bonnie and Clyde and Pretty Boy Floyd and John Dillinger, who robbed banks. Or they were Al Capone and competing gangsters who contested criminal control of lucrative illegal booze during Prohibition. They were not traumatized Doughboys shooting-up schools and theatres and music festivals and venues.

All of it should speak to us today. Our vaunted technology, about which we feel so smug and superior, has proven incapable of winning wars against primitive weapons and tactics. Yet we cling to our idiotic notion of religiously righteous moral superiority and an American Exceptionalism that even the citizenry of that distant, post-Manifest-Destiny America of a hundred years ago would find astonishing.

Even with orbiting constellations of GPS satellites, our drone wars, proxy wars, wars-for-foreign-aid, and remote-control wars have at times given way to U.S. troops forming impromptu horse cavalry and camel brigades in Afghanistan and Iraq. The troops can rediscover the fundamentals, but the leaders are obliviously in fantasyland.

The most common and effective weapon of the tribal forces faced by modern troops is the fragmentation bomb packed with anything made of bits of metal, or even crafted as a basic concussion bomb, circa 1450. It is the improvised explosive device, that our sophisticated warriors have dubbed the "IED," which produces deadly fields, and trails, and roadways, and abandoned villages, that all become "No-Go Zones." It echoes in the minefields and No-Man's Lands of World War One.

Still, the U.S. remains one of only two nations on Earth that refuses to sign the international treaty banning land mines. The other is North Korea.

Perhaps we believe we're too badass to be concerned with world opinion or pesky optics.

Even as we allow optics to alter us. We tell ourselves that the social media to which we are addicted isn't really able to influence us with its selection of "suggested friends" and the thousands of pieces of embedded imagery we see each day. Of course it effects us. The power of even a single image is proven by the people of the Great War in their time. In response to the U.S. WW I poster, "Join the Air Service," 43,000 people enlisted in the predecessor to the Army Air Corps that later became the U.S. Air Force. 43,000 enlisted, when they only had 19 airplanes. Gung ho rah-rah sold then and it sells now. Especially when it's the only way to afford college.

The farther you go, you discern more and more that becomes convergent. Because not unlike World War I, you get the inescapable sense that all the carnage and destruction not only could have and should have been prevented, but was in fact preventable. Especially when it rendered countless personal tragedies and didn't exactly accomplish anything. Rather like our little perpetual wars now.

The lyrics of the spiritual turned folk song, "Ain't gonna study war no more" are a surefire way to project modern smugness into an arrogantly righteous choice to be ignorant, and thus to be willfully unable to see it coming again. And again. And again.

World War One holds countless lessons for our time.

Perhaps some of those points will be raised and receive critical examination in the special TV programming that's out there today about it, but damned hard to find.

Just quickly, it's on two of the three CSPAN channels, with a bit on the PBS side channels, and a good amount more on a precious few of those obscure boutique networks. All are probably in your cable or satellite package, and some offer online simulcasts. But frankly, our search to compile the list tells us it's highly unlikely most people could track-down things they'd be interested in seeing.

Accordingly, we present a guide to today's programming that airs for Veterans Day, with special emphasis on what airs for the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One.
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* NOTE: All World War One / 100th Anniversary of the Armistice programming is preceded with an asterisk.

Listings are chronological, by day and start time.

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Late Friday Night /

Early Saturday on TV

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

12:36 am - "American Artifacts: WWI Combat Artists" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

1 am - "World War I & Trench Warfare" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2:24 am - "Psychiatry & World War I Shell Shock" on CSPAN-3.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2:45-5 am - "They Were Expendable" (1945) is a four-year wartime film with John Wayne and Robert Montgomery that salutes the PT boats, like the real one skippered by Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy (Though his story is not in the movie). On TCM.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3:15 am - "Lectures in History: Experiences of World War I Soldiers" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

4:36 am - "American Artifacts: WWI Combat Artists" on CSPAN-3.



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Saturday on TV

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

5 am - "Reel America: 'America Goes Over - 1918' Silent Film" on CSPAN-3.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

5-6 am - "Remembering Vietnam" (2017) let's Minnesota veterans tell their stories of Vietnam and the illegal war in Laos. On PBS World channel.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

5-8 am - "The Battle of the Bulge" (1965) got a 3-star rating as an actioner, starring Henry Fonda and Robert Shaw. It plays very fast and loose with history. On TCM.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

6 am - "American Artifacts: American World War I Soldiers" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

6:30 am - "U.S. Army Women Telephone Operators in World War I" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

7:20 am - "American Artifacts: Quentin Roosevelt Memorial" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

7:30 am - "American Artifacts: World War I Combat Artists" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

8 am - "Reel America: On the Firing Line with the Germans - 1915" on CSPAN-3.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

8-10:45 am - "Where Eagles Dare" (1969) got 3 stars as pure WW II fiction, when America was immersed in the futile bloodbath of Vietnam. The script is from the novel of the time. On TCM.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10 am-1 pm - "Inside World War II" is a 2013 documentary build upon the firsthand testimonials of more than 50 combat veterans who wore the uniforms of the US, Britain, Germany, and the Soviet Union in WW II. On Nat Geo.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10-11 am - "Journey Home to the USS Arizona" takes a Pearl Harbor veteran's remains to be interred on the shipwreck. On PBS World channel.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10 am - "American Artifacts: German World War I Soldiers" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10:25 am - "World War I German Cemetery" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10:30 am - "American Artifacts: U.S. Army World War I Posters" on CSPAN-3.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10:45 am-2 pm - "The Great Escape" (1963) is a 4-star classic of human ingenuity and perseverance against overwhelming odds. A huge cast of stars of the era tell the essentially true tale of allied POWs attempting to outwit their Nazi captors. It's followed by another all-time classic (see 2 pm listing). On TCM.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

11 am - "African Americans in World War I" on CSPAN-3.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

11 am-noon - "Maggie's War: Courage in World War II" (2013) is the story of a US paratrooper who survived the major aerial assaults in Europe. On PBS World channel.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

Noon-1 pm - "Survivors of Malmedy, December 1944" (2018) gets the story, from the few survivors, of the most infamous massacre of captured troops in WW II Europe. On PBS World channel.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

12:46 pm - "Reel America: 'Chateau-Thierry Sector' U.S. Army Silent Film" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

1 pm - "The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" on CSPAN-3.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

1-2 pm - "Sinking the Lusitania" (2015) is a dramatized documentary that gets inside the fastest ocean liner on the North Atlantic, its ill-fated passengers, and the crew of the German U-boat that sank them. On Smithsonian.

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Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

1-2 pm - "Inside Combat Rescue -- Stand" is a 2014 ep from the series, and it envisioned it was taking a final look at US occupation there and "the final stages of the war." On NatGeo.

___


Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

1-2 pm - "The Last Ridge" (2007) tells the story of the US 10th Mountain Division from WW II to Afghanistan. On PBS World channel.

___



Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2-3 pm - "Wings for Maggie Ray" (2012) documents a woman WASP pilot of WW II. On PBS World channel.

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* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2 pm - "Reel America: 'Unknown Soldier 1921" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2-5 pm - "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957) is WW II fiction that won 7 Oscars. It wo4ks as a psychological exploration of what would come to be called "the Stockholm Syndrome" and as much, much more. It's preceded by another all-time classic (see 10:45 am listing). On TCM.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

2:30 pm - "U.S. Supreme Court During World War I" on CSPAN-3.

___


Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3-4 pm - "War Birds: Diary of an Aviator" (2004) documents three young men who become RAF pilots in WW II. On PBS World channel.

___




Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3-4 pm - "Honor Deferred" (2006) looks at seven black heroes of WW II who came home to soul-crushing racism, and eventually were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. On Military channel.

___



Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3-4 pm - "Mighty Ship at War: Queen Mary" (2016) details the crucial role of the famous liner, now docked in Long Beach, when she carried troops to fight the Nazis. On Smithsonian.

___



Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3-4 pm - "Distant Shore: D-Day" (2008) examines bravery of US black troops in the WW II Normandy invasion. On ACH.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

3:29 pm - "American Artifacts: World War I Soldiers and Art in the Trenches" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

4 pm - "Sergeant York - The Man and the Movie" on CSPAN-3.

___

* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

4:55 pm - "World War I German Cemetery" on CSPAN-3.

___

Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

5-7 pm - "Bataan" (1943) is 3-star drama with Robert Taylor and George Murphy. It told the wartime version of what happened to American forces who were overtaken in the Philippines by the invading Japanese. (Followed by the better-known John Wayne vehicle "Back to Bataan.") On TCM.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

5 pm - "Lectures in History: Myths About America in World War I" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

6:20 pm - "Reel America: 'L'Effort Americain - 1918' French Silent Film" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

6:40 pm - "American Artifacts: French World War I Soldiers" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

7 pm - "Reel America: 'Meuse-Argonne Offensive - 1918' U.S. Army Silent Films" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

7:25 pm - "American Artifacts: Great War Exhibit, Part 1" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

8 :15 pm - "American Artifacts: Great War Exhibit, Part 2" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

9 pm - "Sergeant York - The Man and the Movie" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

9:50 pm - "Reel America: 'Meuse-Argonne Offensive - 1918' U.S. Army Silent Films" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

10:15 pm - "American Artifacts: Great War Exhibit, Part 1" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

11 pm - "American Artifacts Great War Exhibit, Part 2" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sat, Nov 10, on TV:

11:45 pm - "African Americans in World War I" on CSPAN-3.



__________________



Late Saturday /

Early Sunday, on TV

___________________



Sun, Nov 11:

1-2 am - "VA and the Human Cost of War" (2017). On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

1-2 am - "Honor Deferred" (2006) looks at seven black heroes of WW II who came home to soul-crushing racism, and eventually were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. On Military channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

1:30 am - "French Pres. Macron Greets Leaders Arriving at Armistice Day Ceremony." French President Emmanuel Macron greets leaders and delegations arriving at the WWI Armistice Day 100th anniversary ceremony in Paris. LIVE on C-SPAN (CSPAN-1).

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

1:32 am - "American Artifacts: World War I Soldiers and Art in the Trenches" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

2 am - "World War I Armistice Centennial Commemoration." French President Emmanuel Macron hosts world heads of state, including Pres. Trump, at a ceremony in Paris to commemorate the centennial of the Armistice that ended the fighting in World War I. LIVE on C-SPAN (CSPAN-1).

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

2-3 am - "Distant Shore: D-Day" (2008) examines bravery of US black troops in the WW II Normandy invasion. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

2-3 am - "Going to War" (2018) is a candid documentary look at troops before and after endless multiple deployments. On PBS World channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

2:02 am - "Alvin York Medal of Honor Centennial" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

3-4 am - "Pacific War in Color" examines the US island-hopping campaign to take back the Pacific after Japanese conquest. On Smithsonian.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

3:09 am - "Alvin York World War I Battle Location" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

3:30 am - "American Artifacts: WWI Meuse-Argonne Offensive" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

4-5 am - "Unknown Flag Raiser of Iwo Jima" (2016) reveals the true identity of one of the flag raisers, long presumed to be someone else. On Smithsonian.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

4:30 am - "World War I Armistice Centennial" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

5-6 am - "SEAL Dog" (2015) examines the role of four-footed Navy SEALS. On Smithsonian.



__________________



Sunday on TV

__________________





* Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

6 am - "Ceremony at Suresnes WW I American Cemetery." Pres. Trump delivers remarks at the Suresnes American Cemetery in Paris’s western suburbs. LIVE on C-SPAN (CSPAN-1).

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

6 am - "Reel America: 'Unknown Soldier 1921'" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

6:30 am - "World War I & the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

7-8 am - "WWI: The First Modern War: Clouds of Death" examines the introduction of chemical (poison gas) warfare,  on the History Channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

7-8 am - "Honor Deferred" (2006) looks at seven black heroes of WW II who came home to soul-crushing racism, and eventually were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. On Military channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

7:35 am - "Reel America: 'Graves Registration Service' U.S. Army Silent Film" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

7:50 am - "American Artifacts: World War I Soldiers and Art in the Trenches" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

8 am - "Veterans Day Ceremony at Arlington Cemetery." The departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs hold a ceremony commemorating Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. LIVE on C-SPAN (CSPAN-1).

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

8-9 am - "Distant Shore: D-Day" (2008) examines bravery of US black troops in the WW II Normandy invasion. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

8-8:30 am - "10 Things You Don't Know About: George Patton" on the History channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

8:20 am - "The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

8:30 am-noon - "The Dirty Dozen" (1967) is WW II action-flick fiction.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

9:20 am - "Reel America: 'Home Front 1917-1919, War Transforms American Life' - 1965" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

9:40 am - "Sergeant York - The Man and the Movie" on CSPAN-3.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

10:30 am - "Reel America: 'The Lost Battalion - 1919'" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

11 am-noon - "Eagles of Mercy" (2013) brings WW II medics to describe their experiences. On PBS World channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

Noon - "American Artifacts: WWI Centennial, Chateau-Thierry & Belleau Wood" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

Noon -1 pm - "Company of Heroes" (2012) dramatizes US soldiers in WW II. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

Noon-3 pm - "Fury" (2014) is post modern WW II fiction about the crews of American Sherman tanks. On the History Channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

Noon-3 pm - "World War II Confidential" (2017) airs, in a block, all 3 one-hour parts of the series about Allied heads of state. On ACH.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

12:45 pm - "American Artifacts: World War I Battle of Saint-Mihiel" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

1-2 pm - "Omaha Beach: Honor and Sacrifice" (2015) brings D-Day veterans describing their experiences. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

1-2 pm - "The Last B-24" is a 2018 edition of "NOVA'" as the PBS series follows archaeologists to the bottom of the Adriatic Sea in search of an American WW II aircraft. On PBS So Cal 1.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

1-2 pm - "Honor Deferred" (2006) looks at seven black heroes of WW II who came home to soul-crushing racism, and eventually were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. On Military channel.

___



* Sun, Nov 11:

1:30 pm - "American Artifacts: WWI Meuse-Argonne Offensive" on CSPAN-3.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

2-3:30 pm - "Lifeline: Pearl Harbor's Unlikely Hero" (2018) documents one sailor. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

2-3 pm - "Distant Shore: D-Day" (2008) examines bravery of US black troops in the WW II Normandy invasion. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

3-4 pm - "Pearl Harbor: New Evidence" is a 2017 revisionist documentary about the Dec 7, 1941 Japanese attack that brought the US into WW II. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

3:30-4 pm - "Fighting on Both Fronts: the 370th" (2017) documents a all-black combat unit from Illinois in WW II, and how they came home to segregation and discrimination. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

4-5 pm - "Deep Sea Detectives: Japanese Sub at Pearl Harbor" (2003). Discovers the role of mini-submarines in the attack. On Military channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

4-5 pm - "Pearl Harbor: Heroes Who Fought" is a 2016 documentary based on interviews of those who survived the attack. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

5-6 pm - "Pearl Harbor: Declassified" is a 2012 documentary detailing what happened in the Japanese attack.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

6-7 pm - "Hero Ships: USS Texas" (2008) looks at the last "dreadnought," the origina pre-WW l battleships, and the Texas' key role throughout WW II. On Military channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

6-8 pm - "Surviving D-Day" (2011) examines tactics at Normandy. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

7-8:30 pm - "POV: Of Men and War" (2016) looks at the lives of a dozen combat veterans and their families dealing with their PTSD. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

8-9 pm - " World War II in Color" (2009) airs 3p 6, "The Mediterranean and North Africa." On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

8:30-9 pm - "Fighting on Both Fronts: the 370th" (2017) documents a all-black combat unit from Illinois in WW II, and how they came home to segregation and discrimination. On PBS World channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

9-11 pm - "Surviving D-Day" (2011) examines tactics at Normandy. On ACH.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

9-10 pm - "Gun Trucks of Vietnam" (2018). On Smithsonian.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

10-11 pm - "The Spy in the Hanoi Hilton" (2015) is a documentary about shot-down US aviators held captive in North Vietnam.

___



Sun, Nov 11, on TV:

10-11 pm - "Hero Ships: USS Texas" (2008) looks at the last "dreadnought," the origina pre-WW l battleships, and the Texas' key role throughout WW II. On Military channel.

___



Sun, Nov 11:

11 pm-midnight - " World War II in Color" (2009) airs 3p 6, "The Mediterranean and North Africa." On ACH.

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That's all for this edition. Stay tuneful!





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♪ The ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE endeavors to bring you NEWS – and views of interest to artists everywhere – more specifically to musicians and the creative community and music makers and fans of acoustic and Folk-Americana music. That includes both traditional and innovative forms. From the deepest roots to today’s acoustic renaissance, that’s our beat. We provide a wealth of resources, including a HUGE catalog of acoustic-friendly venues (now undergoing a major update), and inside info on FESTIVALS and select performances in Southern California in venues from the monumentally large to the intimately small and cozy. We cover workshops, conferences, and other events for artists and folks in the music industry, and all kinds o’ things in the world of acoustic and Americana and accessible classical music. From washtub bass to musical spoons to oboe to viola to banjo to squeezebox, from Djangostyle to new-fangled-old-time string band music, from sweet Cajun fiddle to bluegrass and pre-bluegrass Appalachian mountain music to all the swamp water roots of the blues and the bright lights of where the music is headed now.



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